Human Studies

​Clinical Research Study: BENEFICIAL

Beans/Bran Enriching Nutritional Eating For Intestinal health & Cancer Including Activity for Longevity is a human clinical research study designed to help identify whether foods such as beans or rice bran, combined with regular physical activity, can lower the risk of colorectal cancer. This research study is a collaboration at Colorado State University, which seeks to improve compliance to lifestyle recommendations and physical activity guidelines for cancer.

Clinical Research Study: BENEFIT

Bean/Bran Enriching Nutritional Eating For Intestinal Health Trial (BENEFIT) is a human clinical research study designed to help identify whether foods such as beans or rice bran affect the microbes that live in your gut. All the types of gut bacteria and their activity are unknown. This research study is being offered in collaboration by Colorado State University and the PVH Cancer Network, which seeks to improve dietary recommendations and nutritional guidelines for cancer control and prevention.

Current research suggests that beans and rice bran have properties for the prevention and control of colorectal cancer. While beans and rice bran show cancer-fighting activity in animal studies, there is limited research for these foods in human studies.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5145262/

Clinical Trial: Healthy Hearts

Healthy Hearts is a human clinical research study designed to learn if the addition of cooked navy bean powder, dietary rice bran, or a combination of both to the diet, can improve cholesterol levels in children. Many studies indicate that increasing the intake of plant-based foods, specifically whole grains and legumes, can protect against CVD. Rice bran and its bioactive components (e.g. γ -oryzanol and tocotrienols) have shown to lower serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels in both animal and human trials. Additionally, individuals that eat dry beans (e.g. pinto, black, navy) have better nutrient intake levels (e.g. fiber, potassium, zinc, iron), weight maintenance, and blood pressure readings compared to non-bean consumers. Although these are promising CVD risk modifying interventions, most of this dietary research in rice bran and dry beans have been completed in adults. Very little is known if these foods have similar CVD protective outcomes in children with CVD risk factors.

This research study is being offered in collaboration by Colorado State University and the Medical Center of the Rockies Research Group.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29404331/

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